Digital Economy - The development of an economy that based on digital computing technologies.

Total Questionnaire Statistics:

Total Responses:

Statistics per question:

Digital Industry 4.0 (e.g. Internet of Things, Cloud Computing, etc.) - Industry 4.0 is the comprehensive transformation of the whole sphere of industrial production through the merging of digital technology and the internet with conventional industry.

Answer
(Google logo indicates automatic translation by Google Translate)
Original Answer
IT-systems have to be safe, thus private and public infrastructure has to be better protected by i.a. a security by design regulation of IT-technology. Governments and companies need to adequately protect citizens and customers against malware and hacker attacks. Not everything that can be connected to the internet should and has to be. In order to not endanger the right to privacy and freedom of the internet, decisions on internet safety measures have to be justified publicly or towards democratically elected decision-makers. Dependence of public institutions on big IT-companies is a troublesome misuse of public money, a problematic interpretation of competition and procurement laws and often a safety issue. Public money should only be used for open source programs.
• AI-/ Digital Marketing Advisory Program: Provide advisors that are directly sent to companies and advice them on what can be improved (also ecological) • diversify alliances under the Important Projects of Common European Interest (IPCEIs) & digital innovation hubs to include more SMEs and peripheral European regions • Better external communication and structured evaluation of European Digital Innovation Hubs: simpler evaluation sheets, display of specific outcomes/projects & provided services along with success/failure stories. This could be used to enrich the currently content-devoid marketing and improve knowledge transfer. Consider the possibility for continued funding over time?
Answer
(Google logo indicates automatic translation by Google Translate)
Original Answer
IT-systems have to be safe, thus private and public infrastructure has to be better protected by i.a. a security by design regulation of IT-technology. Governments and companies need to adequately protect citizens and customers against malware and hacker attacks. Not everything that can be connected to the internet should and has to be. In order to not endanger the right to privacy and freedom of the internet, decisions on internet safety measures have to be justified publicly or towards democratically elected decision-makers. Dependence of public institutions on big IT-companies is a troublesome misuse of public money, a problematic interpretation of competition and procurement laws and often a safety issue. Public money should only be used for open source programs.
• AI-/ Digital Marketing Advisory Program: Provide advisors that are directly sent to companies and advice them on what can be improved (also ecological) • diversify alliances under the Important Projects of Common European Interest (IPCEIs) & digital innovation hubs to include more SMEs and peripheral European regions • Better external communication and structured evaluation of European Digital Innovation Hubs: simpler evaluation sheets, display of specific outcomes/projects & provided services along with success/failure stories. This could be used to enrich the currently content-devoid marketing and improve knowledge transfer. Consider the possibility for continued funding over time?

Digital Finance - The impact of new technologies on the financial services industry. It includes a variety of products, applications, processes and business models that have transformed the traditional way of providing banking and financial services.

Answer
(Google logo indicates automatic translation by Google Translate)
Original Answer
Accessibility of e-banking should be guaranteed for everyone, including for persons with disabilities.
As more banking services are moving online, governments should support digitally excluded groups on this regard, as well as ensure the full implementation of Directive 2014/92/EU
Shortcomings of i.e. MiCA in the regulation of crypto assests (CAs) have to be addressed: 1) CAs are developing and innovating at a fast pace, so in order to catch all CAs in a regulation, the definitions must sufficiently differentiate between crypto-asset types, while also remaining open to new developments that may have to be added later or at a technical level. 2) CAs stay widely unregulated and have many benefits and advantages over regular financial instruments, such as taxation exemptions. It is also unclear, which CAs will fall under MiCA or other financial legislation, such as MiFID II, giving also rise to heterogeneous interpretation on the national level. 3) the unregulated CA market has led to re-emergence of previously outlawed practices that allow for market manipulation and fraud (i.e. studies show a lardge proportion is used financial fraud and money laundering. AML/CFT legislation compliance and supervision are thus essential 4) transparency and information regarding crypto-asset issuers, offerors and price calculation should be increased further to ensure adequate levels of investor protection, improve fraud prevention and increase market access 5) and lastly sustainability concerns of CAs – given their significant ecological footprint - have to be addressed and be taken into consideration during the approval process
Answer
(Google logo indicates automatic translation by Google Translate)
Original Answer
Accessibility of e-banking should be guaranteed for everyone, including for persons with disabilities.
As more banking services are moving online, governments should support digitally excluded groups on this regard, as well as ensure the full implementation of Directive 2014/92/EU
Shortcomings of i.e. MiCA in the regulation of crypto assests (CAs) have to be addressed: 1) CAs are developing and innovating at a fast pace, so in order to catch all CAs in a regulation, the definitions must sufficiently differentiate between crypto-asset types, while also remaining open to new developments that may have to be added later or at a technical level. 2) CAs stay widely unregulated and have many benefits and advantages over regular financial instruments, such as taxation exemptions. It is also unclear, which CAs will fall under MiCA or other financial legislation, such as MiFID II, giving also rise to heterogeneous interpretation on the national level. 3) the unregulated CA market has led to re-emergence of previously outlawed practices that allow for market manipulation and fraud (i.e. studies show a lardge proportion is used financial fraud and money laundering. AML/CFT legislation compliance and supervision are thus essential 4) transparency and information regarding crypto-asset issuers, offerors and price calculation should be increased further to ensure adequate levels of investor protection, improve fraud prevention and increase market access 5) and lastly sustainability concerns of CAs – given their significant ecological footprint - have to be addressed and be taken into consideration during the approval process

Data Economy - The creation of a single market for data in the EU where data can flow across sectors to benefit all and the rules for access and use of data are fair, practical, clear and respected.

Answer
(Google logo indicates automatic translation by Google Translate)
Original Answer
The goal of a common European digital strategy should not primarily be the creation of a common digital or e-commerce market or a European Silicon Valley with its own IT-companies. Regulations should rather focus on the protection of European citizens and consumers as well as the actual adherence of laws, including competition and antitrust laws. A European IT market can only develop with fair market conditions benefitting people and economies. The use of the internet as a common good has to be supported, including open source software and publicly available data.
Strong safeguards for very sensitive data, such as migration status, health records, or reception of welfare benefits, should be included in the creation of a single market for data in the EU
• Dedicated funding opportunities for open source projects • Funding for (existing) open source technology and education platforms (instead of attempting to create own new platforms)
The EU should introduce corporate tax rules so that profits are registered and taxed where businesses have significant interaction with users through digital channels (fair taxation of the digital economy).
Answer
(Google logo indicates automatic translation by Google Translate)
Original Answer
The goal of a common European digital strategy should not primarily be the creation of a common digital or e-commerce market or a European Silicon Valley with its own IT-companies. Regulations should rather focus on the protection of European citizens and consumers as well as the actual adherence of laws, including competition and antitrust laws. A European IT market can only develop with fair market conditions benefitting people and economies. The use of the internet as a common good has to be supported, including open source software and publicly available data.
Strong safeguards for very sensitive data, such as migration status, health records, or reception of welfare benefits, should be included in the creation of a single market for data in the EU
• Dedicated funding opportunities for open source projects • Funding for (existing) open source technology and education platforms (instead of attempting to create own new platforms)
The EU should introduce corporate tax rules so that profits are registered and taxed where businesses have significant interaction with users through digital channels (fair taxation of the digital economy).

Supporting green digital solutions - the use of green digital technologies for the benefit of the environment - mainly by deploying and investing more green digital technologies to achieve climate neutrality and accelerate the green and digital transitions in priority sectors in Europe.

Answer
(Google logo indicates automatic translation by Google Translate)
Original Answer
Digitalization must not be a justification nor a driver for further exploitation of planet, nature and people. As most minerals and resources needed for digital technologies are still mined under terrible violations of human rights and environmentally disastrous conditions, all states and industries involved in mining and processing raw materials need to take responsibility in protecting human rights and the environment along the supply chain with proper due diligence. The purchase of raw materials cannot be primarily dominated by cheapest prices. This needs to be reflected in foreign trade and economic policies as well. Resource consumption, especially in countries of the Global North, has to be reduced to a globally just and sustainable level. Changing economic priorities towards a circular economy, ambitious recycling goals, and a product design based on reusage, repairability, durability and recycling, can significantly decrease resource needs for digitalization. Resource intensive products with no apparent benefit to society, such as RFID tags, should be banned. The advertisement of new products should have to include references on the resource and energy consumption in its production process.
Low-income households should be protected against energy poverty, and specific funds should be allocated to ensure the green transition will not affect already vulnerable households and individuals
• Energy usage reduction also in digital domains: There is a gaping lack of conversation about the impact of Internet Governance (IG) on the most pressing issue of the 21st century. How can actors in IG reduce their carbon footprint and contribution to climate change? For example, through the adoption of green computing, energy efficient servers and machines/processes, and by policy contributions. • Expansion of the too narrow focus often put on blockchains (BCs) to more general solutions, given the environmental impact of BCs, often undesired properties and inferior performance to other database solutions
Answer
(Google logo indicates automatic translation by Google Translate)
Original Answer
Digitalization must not be a justification nor a driver for further exploitation of planet, nature and people. As most minerals and resources needed for digital technologies are still mined under terrible violations of human rights and environmentally disastrous conditions, all states and industries involved in mining and processing raw materials need to take responsibility in protecting human rights and the environment along the supply chain with proper due diligence. The purchase of raw materials cannot be primarily dominated by cheapest prices. This needs to be reflected in foreign trade and economic policies as well. Resource consumption, especially in countries of the Global North, has to be reduced to a globally just and sustainable level. Changing economic priorities towards a circular economy, ambitious recycling goals, and a product design based on reusage, repairability, durability and recycling, can significantly decrease resource needs for digitalization. Resource intensive products with no apparent benefit to society, such as RFID tags, should be banned. The advertisement of new products should have to include references on the resource and energy consumption in its production process.
Low-income households should be protected against energy poverty, and specific funds should be allocated to ensure the green transition will not affect already vulnerable households and individuals
• Energy usage reduction also in digital domains: There is a gaping lack of conversation about the impact of Internet Governance (IG) on the most pressing issue of the 21st century. How can actors in IG reduce their carbon footprint and contribution to climate change? For example, through the adoption of green computing, energy efficient servers and machines/processes, and by policy contributions. • Expansion of the too narrow focus often put on blockchains (BCs) to more general solutions, given the environmental impact of BCs, often undesired properties and inferior performance to other database solutions

Supporting green digital solutions - the use of green digital technologies for the benefit of the environment - mainly by deploying and investing more green digital technologies to achieve climate neutrality and accelerate the green and digital transitions in priority sectors in Europe.

Answer
(Google logo indicates automatic translation by Google Translate)
Original Answer
First and foremost, we need an immediate fossil fuel phase-out. Digital policies, new digital research fields and economic interests should not obscure this political necessity. Similarly, nuclear energy is not a clean energy source and no alternative to fossil-based energy production. A sustainable digitalization can only be based on efficient, clean, fair, accessible, decentralized renewable energies. National, regional and global strategies and effective legislation to decrease the energy use of IT and communication technology are urgently needed. This includes ecodesign policies and comprehensive energy efficiency labeling. Future regulation should prohibit glued-in batteries or accumulators in electronic devises in order to ensure users to freely and autonomously replace them. The interlinkage between decentralized renewable energies and decentralized internet infrastructure has to be supported and expanded. Big IT-companies carry a social, ecological and economical responsibility to fight climate change. IT-companies have to move to 100% renewable energy in the next years, improve their energy efficiency and transparently disclose the source of their energy supply.
Answer
(Google logo indicates automatic translation by Google Translate)
Original Answer
First and foremost, we need an immediate fossil fuel phase-out. Digital policies, new digital research fields and economic interests should not obscure this political necessity. Similarly, nuclear energy is not a clean energy source and no alternative to fossil-based energy production. A sustainable digitalization can only be based on efficient, clean, fair, accessible, decentralized renewable energies. National, regional and global strategies and effective legislation to decrease the energy use of IT and communication technology are urgently needed. This includes ecodesign policies and comprehensive energy efficiency labeling. Future regulation should prohibit glued-in batteries or accumulators in electronic devises in order to ensure users to freely and autonomously replace them. The interlinkage between decentralized renewable energies and decentralized internet infrastructure has to be supported and expanded. Big IT-companies carry a social, ecological and economical responsibility to fight climate change. IT-companies have to move to 100% renewable energy in the next years, improve their energy efficiency and transparently disclose the source of their energy supply.

Social Welfare in the digital age - Digital transformation of public welfare services.

Answer
(Google logo indicates automatic translation by Google Translate)
Original Answer
Investments in the health sector must first and foremost be directed towards realizing key demands of employees and trade unions such as decent pay and work, as well as a fair, accessible, and affordable health sector. Use of (Big) Data in health and care sectors has to be regulated and monitored. Online services in the health sector have to follow the highest security standards with offline options remaining in place. In health and care facilities, the protection of privacy has to be ensured by applying high data protection standards. Commercializing patient data has to be prohibited. The use of data must not lead to deterioration in insurance services. Limited capabilities to agree on the use of digital services must not be abused. Digital Services, such as care robots or communication and management software, have to service staff and patients, and not lead to even more work and financial pressure in health and care facilities. They have to be developed and applied in collaboration with staff, patients and relatives and respect patient’s rights and dignity. The responsibility and final decision on medical procedures must always lie with humans. Transparency on digital measures and algorithms has to always be a priority and be accessible to patients and relatives with opting-out options.
To ensure digitally and socially excluded groups can access social welfare, governments should support them with funds and personnel, and in-person services should be kept even if reduced. Digital welfare services should not lead to discrimination when receiving welfare benefits
Answer
(Google logo indicates automatic translation by Google Translate)
Original Answer
Investments in the health sector must first and foremost be directed towards realizing key demands of employees and trade unions such as decent pay and work, as well as a fair, accessible, and affordable health sector. Use of (Big) Data in health and care sectors has to be regulated and monitored. Online services in the health sector have to follow the highest security standards with offline options remaining in place. In health and care facilities, the protection of privacy has to be ensured by applying high data protection standards. Commercializing patient data has to be prohibited. The use of data must not lead to deterioration in insurance services. Limited capabilities to agree on the use of digital services must not be abused. Digital Services, such as care robots or communication and management software, have to service staff and patients, and not lead to even more work and financial pressure in health and care facilities. They have to be developed and applied in collaboration with staff, patients and relatives and respect patient’s rights and dignity. The responsibility and final decision on medical procedures must always lie with humans. Transparency on digital measures and algorithms has to always be a priority and be accessible to patients and relatives with opting-out options.
To ensure digitally and socially excluded groups can access social welfare, governments should support them with funds and personnel, and in-person services should be kept even if reduced. Digital welfare services should not lead to discrimination when receiving welfare benefits

Digital Business/Companies - The use of technology to create new value in business models, customer experiences and the internal capabilities that support its core operations. (e.g. Uber, Amazon, etc).

Answer
(Google logo indicates automatic translation by Google Translate)
Original Answer
In order to prevent an increase of unemployment due to changes in a digital world’s work place, we suggest a reduction of working hours down to 35-30 hours a week with a minimum of 30 vacation days. Freelancers and contract workers need to get the same social protection as the regular work force. Proper regulation of temporary work and contracted services need to be introduced and implemented. There should be no exceptions from minimum wage. This is especially important for platform economies. Clear rules and rights for unavailability and conditions for a healthy work-life balance need to be established in every company. Introducing efficiency or behavior controls, such as inactivity protocols, have to be prohibited. To counter cutback on labor standards, staff associations should be a requirement. Any introduction of new technologies in a company has to follow proper staff participation processes. This includes clearly stating their usage, goals, details of software etc. and appropriate staff training. A free and fair internet needs space and competition for alternative, non-commercial, non-monopolistic products. Therefore, antitrust and competition laws have to be rigorously applied – including in the case of digital companies. IT and digital companies have to pay taxes where they generate revenue. Effective measures against tax evasion and fraud have to be applied nationally and internationally, including the strengthening of tax bodies and international tax cooperation within the EU and in an open and democratic UN institution.
EU should regulate the working conditions of digital platform work in order to adress new forms of precariousness, insufficient social protection and the issue of algorithmic management (protecting people working through platforms).
Answer
(Google logo indicates automatic translation by Google Translate)
Original Answer
In order to prevent an increase of unemployment due to changes in a digital world’s work place, we suggest a reduction of working hours down to 35-30 hours a week with a minimum of 30 vacation days. Freelancers and contract workers need to get the same social protection as the regular work force. Proper regulation of temporary work and contracted services need to be introduced and implemented. There should be no exceptions from minimum wage. This is especially important for platform economies. Clear rules and rights for unavailability and conditions for a healthy work-life balance need to be established in every company. Introducing efficiency or behavior controls, such as inactivity protocols, have to be prohibited. To counter cutback on labor standards, staff associations should be a requirement. Any introduction of new technologies in a company has to follow proper staff participation processes. This includes clearly stating their usage, goals, details of software etc. and appropriate staff training. A free and fair internet needs space and competition for alternative, non-commercial, non-monopolistic products. Therefore, antitrust and competition laws have to be rigorously applied – including in the case of digital companies. IT and digital companies have to pay taxes where they generate revenue. Effective measures against tax evasion and fraud have to be applied nationally and internationally, including the strengthening of tax bodies and international tax cooperation within the EU and in an open and democratic UN institution.
EU should regulate the working conditions of digital platform work in order to adress new forms of precariousness, insufficient social protection and the issue of algorithmic management (protecting people working through platforms).

Other

Answer
(Google logo indicates automatic translation by Google Translate)
Original Answer
Trade is missing: Technology transfer, fair trade policies, development of local and regional markets and exchange of knowledge and funds are the basis for a sustainable economy for all people. E-Commerce can be a tool for development if it enables fair and equal access to economic development and participation. The development of local and regional alternatives of IT-products independent of the world market has to be made possible for developing countries. Similarly to other products, e-commerce has to ensure that developing countries can participate in the world market if the people living in those countries want to. It should not undermine other offline markets relevant for people’s survival and well-being. There needs to be a space for offline economic activities as well. Digital services should be settled outside of trade agreements. If they are already included in trade agreements, transboundary flow of data, data localization, protection of personal data and privacy, transfer of and access to open source code, accountability, regulatory cooperation, net neutrality among other things have to be regulated.
Digitalization should be done in an inclusive and participatory manner. Care should be taken that digital transformation does not leave persons behind due to inaccessibility, unavailability, unaffordability of technologies for citizens, or due to their lack of connectivity or digital skills. Sustainability must also consider social sustainability, i.e., building infrastructure and deploying technologies which are and will be accessible and considerate of everyone’s needs now and in coming decades. Digitalisation should not lead to reduction and disappearance of non-digital solutions for social, political, economic, and cultural participation of citizens. There will always be persons who for one reason or the other prefer to engage in non-digital ways. The non-digital option must always be available for them.
Answer
(Google logo indicates automatic translation by Google Translate)
Original Answer
Trade is missing: Technology transfer, fair trade policies, development of local and regional markets and exchange of knowledge and funds are the basis for a sustainable economy for all people. E-Commerce can be a tool for development if it enables fair and equal access to economic development and participation. The development of local and regional alternatives of IT-products independent of the world market has to be made possible for developing countries. Similarly to other products, e-commerce has to ensure that developing countries can participate in the world market if the people living in those countries want to. It should not undermine other offline markets relevant for people’s survival and well-being. There needs to be a space for offline economic activities as well. Digital services should be settled outside of trade agreements. If they are already included in trade agreements, transboundary flow of data, data localization, protection of personal data and privacy, transfer of and access to open source code, accountability, regulatory cooperation, net neutrality among other things have to be regulated.
Digitalization should be done in an inclusive and participatory manner. Care should be taken that digital transformation does not leave persons behind due to inaccessibility, unavailability, unaffordability of technologies for citizens, or due to their lack of connectivity or digital skills. Sustainability must also consider social sustainability, i.e., building infrastructure and deploying technologies which are and will be accessible and considerate of everyone’s needs now and in coming decades. Digitalisation should not lead to reduction and disappearance of non-digital solutions for social, political, economic, and cultural participation of citizens. There will always be persons who for one reason or the other prefer to engage in non-digital ways. The non-digital option must always be available for them.