Digital Rights - Defending rights and freedoms online.

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Secure and sustainable digital infrastructures - The right of everyone to have an access to technological infrastructures.

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IT-systems have to be safe, thus private and public infrastructure has to be better protected by i.a. a security by design regulation of IT-technology. Governments and companies need to adequately protect citizens and customers against malware and hacker attacks. Not everything that can be connected to the internet should and has to be. In order to not endanger the right to privacy and freedom of the internet, decisions on internet safety measures have to be justified publicly or towards democratically elected decision-makers. When it comes to new technologies, such as blockchain, questions concerning access or design for e.g. human and civil rights, the protection of data, abidance to laws and regulations, responsibilities, as well as its environmental footprint need to be in the center of any discussion. Therefore, governments have to become more knowledgeable, act faster, and not be primarily guided by economic criteria.
The EU Strategy for the rights of persons with disabilities 2021-2030 notes that 64.3% of persons with disabilities aged 16+ have an internet connection at home compared to 87.9% of persons without disabilities. As required by the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, EU and Member States must ensure persons with disabilities equal access to information and communications technologies, and other facilities open to the public, both in urban and rural areas (Article 9).
Governments should allocate specific policies and funds for people facing material deprivation (e.g. low-income households, the homeless) so everyone can access digital infrastructures. They should also increase the number and capacity of public charging stations, public Wi-Fi networks, or equipment of service providers.
Ensure access for everyone - particularly isolated communities - to the internet in order to foster inclusive and participatory societies. Internet shutdowns (in and outside the EU) should be systematically condemned as unacceptable violations of the right to access information and freedom of expression online.
• Access to the internet and to digital resources must become a public good. Citizens must have the resources to engage in this process but also to have the opportunity to experience ICT tools freely, understanding how to use them. • Close digital infrastructure gaps by targeting investments in digital infrastructure to those regions in which citizens lack access to technological infrastructures.
The EU digital transformation policies should deliver better results in enabling universal access, the quality of the high speed internet and affordable computer equipment for the citizens. For example, some EU countries are modifying universal access standards by increasing the functional internet access at download speed of 10 Mbit/s, while Sweden is planning to offer gigabit internet access (100 Mbit/s,) as an universal service. In relation to the affordable computer equipment, the EU citizens are heavily dependant from non EU suppliers. The EU should secure European digital sovereignty in the area of the affordable computer equipment.
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Original Answer
IT-systems have to be safe, thus private and public infrastructure has to be better protected by i.a. a security by design regulation of IT-technology. Governments and companies need to adequately protect citizens and customers against malware and hacker attacks. Not everything that can be connected to the internet should and has to be. In order to not endanger the right to privacy and freedom of the internet, decisions on internet safety measures have to be justified publicly or towards democratically elected decision-makers. When it comes to new technologies, such as blockchain, questions concerning access or design for e.g. human and civil rights, the protection of data, abidance to laws and regulations, responsibilities, as well as its environmental footprint need to be in the center of any discussion. Therefore, governments have to become more knowledgeable, act faster, and not be primarily guided by economic criteria.
The EU Strategy for the rights of persons with disabilities 2021-2030 notes that 64.3% of persons with disabilities aged 16+ have an internet connection at home compared to 87.9% of persons without disabilities. As required by the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, EU and Member States must ensure persons with disabilities equal access to information and communications technologies, and other facilities open to the public, both in urban and rural areas (Article 9).
Governments should allocate specific policies and funds for people facing material deprivation (e.g. low-income households, the homeless) so everyone can access digital infrastructures. They should also increase the number and capacity of public charging stations, public Wi-Fi networks, or equipment of service providers.
Ensure access for everyone - particularly isolated communities - to the internet in order to foster inclusive and participatory societies. Internet shutdowns (in and outside the EU) should be systematically condemned as unacceptable violations of the right to access information and freedom of expression online.
• Access to the internet and to digital resources must become a public good. Citizens must have the resources to engage in this process but also to have the opportunity to experience ICT tools freely, understanding how to use them. • Close digital infrastructure gaps by targeting investments in digital infrastructure to those regions in which citizens lack access to technological infrastructures.
The EU digital transformation policies should deliver better results in enabling universal access, the quality of the high speed internet and affordable computer equipment for the citizens. For example, some EU countries are modifying universal access standards by increasing the functional internet access at download speed of 10 Mbit/s, while Sweden is planning to offer gigabit internet access (100 Mbit/s,) as an universal service. In relation to the affordable computer equipment, the EU citizens are heavily dependant from non EU suppliers. The EU should secure European digital sovereignty in the area of the affordable computer equipment.

Digital citizenship: The development of a framework of digital rights and principles that will help promote and uphold EU values in the digital space.

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Digital technologies can be tools for mass surveillance, with the power to silence free speech and freedom of information. They are also the basis for an ever growing business model. Thus, the control of data has to lie with people providing the data. Governments and international or regional institutions, such as the EU, have a responsibility to protect the rights, privacy, self-determination and autonomy of its citizens and ensure a free basic democratic order. Governments and corporations must follow the principle of data minimization. Governments have to prosecute offences against data privacy violations by commercial enterprises and government intuitions. Data-driven business models need to be regulated properly.
Right to equal access to the EU digital space should be integral part of this framework.
• Expand the definition of digital citizenship in national digital strategies to include skills needed for active participation in society.
• Address rural lack of digital infrastructure creating an asymmetry of access to information and ensuring that no startups would ever move to those areas • Digital Euro with a binary wallet system that allows for limited anonymous petty cash usage and controlled accounts for unlimited currency transfers • Addressing loneliness in the digital world
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Original Answer
Digital technologies can be tools for mass surveillance, with the power to silence free speech and freedom of information. They are also the basis for an ever growing business model. Thus, the control of data has to lie with people providing the data. Governments and international or regional institutions, such as the EU, have a responsibility to protect the rights, privacy, self-determination and autonomy of its citizens and ensure a free basic democratic order. Governments and corporations must follow the principle of data minimization. Governments have to prosecute offences against data privacy violations by commercial enterprises and government intuitions. Data-driven business models need to be regulated properly.
Right to equal access to the EU digital space should be integral part of this framework.
• Expand the definition of digital citizenship in national digital strategies to include skills needed for active participation in society.
• Address rural lack of digital infrastructure creating an asymmetry of access to information and ensuring that no startups would ever move to those areas • Digital Euro with a binary wallet system that allows for limited anonymous petty cash usage and controlled accounts for unlimited currency transfers • Addressing loneliness in the digital world

Digital Services - The right to fair, transparent and accountable digital services' content moderation processes; ensuring that fundamental rights are respected and guaranteeing independent recourse to judicial redress.

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(1) Investments in the health sector must first and foremost be directed towards realizing key demands of employees and trade unions such as decent pay and work, as well as a fair, accessible, and affordable health sector. (2) Use of (Big) Data in health and care sectors has to be regulated and monitored. Online services in the health sector have to follow the highest security standards with offline options remaining in place. In health and care facilities, the protection of privacy has to be ensured by applying high data protection standards. Commercializing patient data has to be prohibited. The use of data must not lead to deterioration in insurance services. Limited capabilities to agree on the use of digital services must not be abused. (3) Digital Services, such as care robots or communication and management software, have to service staff and patients, and not lead to even more work and financial pressure in health and care facilities. They have to be developed and applied in collaboration with staff, patients and relatives and respect patient’s rights and dignity. (4) The responsibility and final decision on medical procedures must always lie with humans. Transparency on digital measures and algorithms has to always be a priority and be accessible to patients and relatives with opting-out options.
EU Digital Services and Digital Markets Acts need to be improved to ensure accessibility of digital services and platforms for persons with disabilities. Lack of accessibility will negatively impact their right to non-discrimination and privacy. Content moderation systems should be accessible, as well as reporting, complaints and redress mechanisms.
Strengthen accountability and transparency in digital technology markets with strong policy instruments implemented by well-resourced and independent enforcement agencies. Ensure digital giants are appropriately taxed so that the benefits of automation and digital growth can be used by governments in order to provide public goods for the benefit of society as a whole, and help overcome the inequality that is so pernicious to democracies.
1. Additional obligations should be imposed on online content providers to provide clear notice-and-take down mechanisms for end-users to flag potentially illegal/harmful content as well as redress mechanisms. The new EU regulatory framework should clarify that the obligation to promptly remove illegal content should only apply when the request comes from an independent judicial authorities or oversight body. Government law enforcement agencies requesting the removal of online content should also be subject to the same procedural safeguards in order to avoid the risk of potential abuse of powers and politically motivated censorship. 2. Online content providers should not rely exclusively on automated processes (algorithm-driven or AI-based mechanisms) – as this can exacerbate existing biases and inequal treatment towards already marginalized communities - to detect potentially illegal content but should always support such processes with human review. 3. EU regulation should mandate online platforms to grant data access to researchers and civil society organisations conducting studies of their functioning in the public interest.
EU should adopt stricter regulation relating to the content removal and account termination policies of the digital services providers. Also, the digital service providers such as Twitter, Facebook and Instagram should enable better user support and appeal processes.
Answer
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Original Answer
(1) Investments in the health sector must first and foremost be directed towards realizing key demands of employees and trade unions such as decent pay and work, as well as a fair, accessible, and affordable health sector. (2) Use of (Big) Data in health and care sectors has to be regulated and monitored. Online services in the health sector have to follow the highest security standards with offline options remaining in place. In health and care facilities, the protection of privacy has to be ensured by applying high data protection standards. Commercializing patient data has to be prohibited. The use of data must not lead to deterioration in insurance services. Limited capabilities to agree on the use of digital services must not be abused. (3) Digital Services, such as care robots or communication and management software, have to service staff and patients, and not lead to even more work and financial pressure in health and care facilities. They have to be developed and applied in collaboration with staff, patients and relatives and respect patient’s rights and dignity. (4) The responsibility and final decision on medical procedures must always lie with humans. Transparency on digital measures and algorithms has to always be a priority and be accessible to patients and relatives with opting-out options.
EU Digital Services and Digital Markets Acts need to be improved to ensure accessibility of digital services and platforms for persons with disabilities. Lack of accessibility will negatively impact their right to non-discrimination and privacy. Content moderation systems should be accessible, as well as reporting, complaints and redress mechanisms.
Strengthen accountability and transparency in digital technology markets with strong policy instruments implemented by well-resourced and independent enforcement agencies. Ensure digital giants are appropriately taxed so that the benefits of automation and digital growth can be used by governments in order to provide public goods for the benefit of society as a whole, and help overcome the inequality that is so pernicious to democracies.
1. Additional obligations should be imposed on online content providers to provide clear notice-and-take down mechanisms for end-users to flag potentially illegal/harmful content as well as redress mechanisms. The new EU regulatory framework should clarify that the obligation to promptly remove illegal content should only apply when the request comes from an independent judicial authorities or oversight body. Government law enforcement agencies requesting the removal of online content should also be subject to the same procedural safeguards in order to avoid the risk of potential abuse of powers and politically motivated censorship. 2. Online content providers should not rely exclusively on automated processes (algorithm-driven or AI-based mechanisms) – as this can exacerbate existing biases and inequal treatment towards already marginalized communities - to detect potentially illegal content but should always support such processes with human review. 3. EU regulation should mandate online platforms to grant data access to researchers and civil society organisations conducting studies of their functioning in the public interest.
EU should adopt stricter regulation relating to the content removal and account termination policies of the digital services providers. Also, the digital service providers such as Twitter, Facebook and Instagram should enable better user support and appeal processes.

Online Privacy - The level of privacy protection an individual has while connected to the Internet, such as the amount of online security available for personal and financial data, communications, and preferences.

Answer
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Original Answer
The principles of privacy by design and privacy by default have to be applied. Governments should introduce data protection regulation and continue to improve and implement existing legislation such as the GDPR. E-privacy legislation needs to be adopted as soon as possible, including a regulation on the use of search engine data and communication software. Tracking has to be limited. Data processors have to ensure all regulations of data protection are applied during the whole process of data handling. A violation of data protection law or against fundamental rights has to be prosecuted. This includes rigorous and consequent follow-up on nuisances and scandals even if commercial interest might be impaired. The right to privacy has to be ensured. Data encryption as a mean of self-protection is a fundamental right and must not be restricted. This includes the right not to supply any authority with passwords or encryption keys. Anonymity is an important right in the real as well as digital world. Any data that is not objectively needed must not be collected by the state or companies. Any incidental data has to be deleted immediately if no reason for storage can be named. The dissemination of illegally or wrongly obtained data as well as data abuse has to lead to appropriate penalties. Data protection laws have to include the fact that legal access to data does not allow for junction of data. A violation of e.g. the EU GDPR by security agencies has to be transparently and publicly accounted for. Anonymous mobile communication has to be protected legally and technically. The right to be forgotten has to be implemented. This has to apply to all people independent of their citizenship.
Ensuring privacy of disability and health-related sensitive data is vital. Many websites can detect if a person is using an assistive technology (e.g. screen reader) to access them. This means a person's disability can be revealed without their will, which can lead to algorithmic discrimination (e.g. targeted ads about vacancies, services, avoiding persons with disabilities) or discrimination and harassment by entities and individuals possessing that data. Proper safeguards should be put in place to ensure persons’ data are not shared without their informed consent. The choice of not disclosing data should not come at the expense of not having access to a services (e.g. unless a person agrees with sharing their data as part of terms of service, they cannot access an online store).
1. Protect encryption: none of the benefits of breaking encryption for law enforcement agencies outweigh this risk for people’s privacy. 2. Ban mass surveillance and facial recognition technologies, as they fundamentally undermine an enabling environment for democratic societies, threatening political pluralism and civil and political rights, as none of the benefits of facial recognition for law enforcement agencies outweigh this risk.
• the e-Privacy Directive is inconsistent and demonstrates a bipolar relationship with data protection as it forsees the decryption and screening of all chat service messages. Also important nuances do not find any reflection, this includes i.e: 1) the difference between a) a website adapting to my user behaviour based on collected service usage data/metadata, and b) the analysis/reading of my private conversations in full by companies and government agencies or 2) the difference between a) AI-based automated evaluation of data by companies to provide better functions and b) the collection, evaluation and ultimately selling private data to third parties, • an update of the GDPR is nessesary, as it focuses too much on stopping data use and too little on actually protecting the privacy of natural persons. i.e. it does not 1) differentiate between types of businesses, nor business sectors, whose needs and regulations are often very different, 2) its risk-based approach does not sufficiently take into consideration the difference between data protection and privacy protection, or different levels of strength of data breaches 3) its rigid approach of the GDPR is not future- nor presence-compliant by virtue of beeing inherited from older data protection laws ignoring important technological advances of the 21st century. An example is purpose limitation: Individuals whose data is to be used must actively consent each time the purpose of using their data changes, which is legitimate in many areas, e.g. when data is to be shared with third parties, but is more of a hindrance i.e. in scientific work hypotheses and theories change and thus the specific purpose often change; or potentially in AI development, which may only flourish if it can analyse and manipulate a variety of data. This [different types of purposes and areas of application] should be analyzed and taken into consideration.
Answer
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Original Answer
The principles of privacy by design and privacy by default have to be applied. Governments should introduce data protection regulation and continue to improve and implement existing legislation such as the GDPR. E-privacy legislation needs to be adopted as soon as possible, including a regulation on the use of search engine data and communication software. Tracking has to be limited. Data processors have to ensure all regulations of data protection are applied during the whole process of data handling. A violation of data protection law or against fundamental rights has to be prosecuted. This includes rigorous and consequent follow-up on nuisances and scandals even if commercial interest might be impaired. The right to privacy has to be ensured. Data encryption as a mean of self-protection is a fundamental right and must not be restricted. This includes the right not to supply any authority with passwords or encryption keys. Anonymity is an important right in the real as well as digital world. Any data that is not objectively needed must not be collected by the state or companies. Any incidental data has to be deleted immediately if no reason for storage can be named. The dissemination of illegally or wrongly obtained data as well as data abuse has to lead to appropriate penalties. Data protection laws have to include the fact that legal access to data does not allow for junction of data. A violation of e.g. the EU GDPR by security agencies has to be transparently and publicly accounted for. Anonymous mobile communication has to be protected legally and technically. The right to be forgotten has to be implemented. This has to apply to all people independent of their citizenship.
Ensuring privacy of disability and health-related sensitive data is vital. Many websites can detect if a person is using an assistive technology (e.g. screen reader) to access them. This means a person's disability can be revealed without their will, which can lead to algorithmic discrimination (e.g. targeted ads about vacancies, services, avoiding persons with disabilities) or discrimination and harassment by entities and individuals possessing that data. Proper safeguards should be put in place to ensure persons’ data are not shared without their informed consent. The choice of not disclosing data should not come at the expense of not having access to a services (e.g. unless a person agrees with sharing their data as part of terms of service, they cannot access an online store).
1. Protect encryption: none of the benefits of breaking encryption for law enforcement agencies outweigh this risk for people’s privacy. 2. Ban mass surveillance and facial recognition technologies, as they fundamentally undermine an enabling environment for democratic societies, threatening political pluralism and civil and political rights, as none of the benefits of facial recognition for law enforcement agencies outweigh this risk.
• the e-Privacy Directive is inconsistent and demonstrates a bipolar relationship with data protection as it forsees the decryption and screening of all chat service messages. Also important nuances do not find any reflection, this includes i.e: 1) the difference between a) a website adapting to my user behaviour based on collected service usage data/metadata, and b) the analysis/reading of my private conversations in full by companies and government agencies or 2) the difference between a) AI-based automated evaluation of data by companies to provide better functions and b) the collection, evaluation and ultimately selling private data to third parties, • an update of the GDPR is nessesary, as it focuses too much on stopping data use and too little on actually protecting the privacy of natural persons. i.e. it does not 1) differentiate between types of businesses, nor business sectors, whose needs and regulations are often very different, 2) its risk-based approach does not sufficiently take into consideration the difference between data protection and privacy protection, or different levels of strength of data breaches 3) its rigid approach of the GDPR is not future- nor presence-compliant by virtue of beeing inherited from older data protection laws ignoring important technological advances of the 21st century. An example is purpose limitation: Individuals whose data is to be used must actively consent each time the purpose of using their data changes, which is legitimate in many areas, e.g. when data is to be shared with third parties, but is more of a hindrance i.e. in scientific work hypotheses and theories change and thus the specific purpose often change; or potentially in AI development, which may only flourish if it can analyse and manipulate a variety of data. This [different types of purposes and areas of application] should be analyzed and taken into consideration.

E-Information - The right to access information given by governments, companies, etc.

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Original Answer
This information must be easy to understand, easy to find, and accessible for everyone. This includes providing information in national sign languages and easy to read format. The platforms, tools and technologies to access this information should be accessible as well. Citizens must always have the option of non-digital access to information.
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Original Answer
This information must be easy to understand, easy to find, and accessible for everyone. This includes providing information in national sign languages and easy to read format. The platforms, tools and technologies to access this information should be accessible as well. Citizens must always have the option of non-digital access to information.

Net Neutrality - The right to internet access which should be offered to everyone on a nondiscriminatory basis, without favoring certain websites, applications, or services.

Answer
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Original Answer
Net neutrality should be protected by law to guarantee free and fair sharing of content online.
Stand for net neutrality to guarantee that no information on the internet is discriminated against on the basis of arbitrary criteria. This goes hand in hand with pursuing internet decentralisation with the aim to provide private, secure, and censorship-resistant access to information online
Address increased internet centralization: how to prevent a few giant global companies from running most of the services (end-user applications, app-stores, device neutrality, infrastructure) and holding most of the data; restoring competition through regulation (e.g. the European DSA/DMA efforts) and through open source, open standards and interoperability.
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Original Answer
Net neutrality should be protected by law to guarantee free and fair sharing of content online.
Stand for net neutrality to guarantee that no information on the internet is discriminated against on the basis of arbitrary criteria. This goes hand in hand with pursuing internet decentralisation with the aim to provide private, secure, and censorship-resistant access to information online
Address increased internet centralization: how to prevent a few giant global companies from running most of the services (end-user applications, app-stores, device neutrality, infrastructure) and holding most of the data; restoring competition through regulation (e.g. the European DSA/DMA efforts) and through open source, open standards and interoperability.

Data (Protection and Retention) - the right to data protection and knowledge about data retention.

Answer
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Original Answer
Data protection and privacy of all persons should be guaranteed. At the moment the GDPR makes an exemption for requiring explicit consent for data processing of persons who lack legal capacity. Given the prevalence of discriminatory and abusive laws in Member States, many persons with intellectual disabilities, psychosocial disabilities, and mental ill-health are subjected to guardianship and therefore lack legal capacity. This is unacceptable violation of privacy of these individuals; everyone’s privacy should be respected!
Strengthen data protection in Europe through strengthened cross-border powers for enforcing the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) and building greater capacity among data protection authorities.
Answer
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Original Answer
Data protection and privacy of all persons should be guaranteed. At the moment the GDPR makes an exemption for requiring explicit consent for data processing of persons who lack legal capacity. Given the prevalence of discriminatory and abusive laws in Member States, many persons with intellectual disabilities, psychosocial disabilities, and mental ill-health are subjected to guardianship and therefore lack legal capacity. This is unacceptable violation of privacy of these individuals; everyone’s privacy should be respected!
Strengthen data protection in Europe through strengthened cross-border powers for enforcing the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) and building greater capacity among data protection authorities.

Copyright - Traditionally, the exclusive and assignable legal right, given to the originator for a fixed number of years, to print, publish, perform, film, or record literary, artistic, or musical material. In the digital age, copyright should be implemented in a way which benefits creators and society.

Answer
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Original Answer
Given the absence of accessible content, such as films, books, artistic material, etc, certain copyright exemptions should be made to allow organisations to make these works accessible for persons with disabilities, as is the case for books, including e-books, under the Marrakesh Treaty.
Harmonization of broadcasting standards, reducing geoblocking, enabling multilingual/national broadcasting with access to subtitles and different language audio-tracks / reduce or remove geoblocking for media contents (such as movies) and reduce language barriers by unblocking translations/subtitles that are only available in certain geographical regions, whereas Europeans are mobile and would like to learn other language)
Answer
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Original Answer
Given the absence of accessible content, such as films, books, artistic material, etc, certain copyright exemptions should be made to allow organisations to make these works accessible for persons with disabilities, as is the case for books, including e-books, under the Marrakesh Treaty.
Harmonization of broadcasting standards, reducing geoblocking, enabling multilingual/national broadcasting with access to subtitles and different language audio-tracks / reduce or remove geoblocking for media contents (such as movies) and reduce language barriers by unblocking translations/subtitles that are only available in certain geographical regions, whereas Europeans are mobile and would like to learn other language)

Online safety of journalists and ensuring plurality of voices in digital media markets- The protection of journalists and media workers against the threats to freedom of expression and plurality of information.

Answer
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Original Answer
The DSA should include an obligation to allow for third party recommender systems who can promote media pluralism and a diversity of opinions .
1. The EU and Member states should adopt measures to promote online media diversity. 2. Resources should be made available to encourage groups that are traditionally marginalized and underrepresented in (online) media landscape.
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Original Answer
The DSA should include an obligation to allow for third party recommender systems who can promote media pluralism and a diversity of opinions .
1. The EU and Member states should adopt measures to promote online media diversity. 2. Resources should be made available to encourage groups that are traditionally marginalized and underrepresented in (online) media landscape.

Protecting fundamental rights in the online environment.

Answer
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Original Answer
A healthy environment and planet, the protection of human rights and a good life for all are more important than digitalization. Any technical and digital advancements have to serve humanity and subject to fundamental and human rights, rule of law and democratic principles. Governments and private actors need to be hold accountable.
The DSA risk assessments should cover all fundamental rights issues, and rather than be conducted by online platforms, be conducted by the Fundamental Rights Agency or another independent human rights watchdog.
Relevant EU and Member state fundamental rights legislation should include the protection of these rights in the online environment and if needed adjusted accordingly. This should be done in consultation with civil society organizations.
EU digital transformation policies should provide more resources for enabling digital inclusion of vulnerable people (socially excluded people, ethnic minorities, older people and people with disabilities).
Answer
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Original Answer
A healthy environment and planet, the protection of human rights and a good life for all are more important than digitalization. Any technical and digital advancements have to serve humanity and subject to fundamental and human rights, rule of law and democratic principles. Governments and private actors need to be hold accountable.
The DSA risk assessments should cover all fundamental rights issues, and rather than be conducted by online platforms, be conducted by the Fundamental Rights Agency or another independent human rights watchdog.
Relevant EU and Member state fundamental rights legislation should include the protection of these rights in the online environment and if needed adjusted accordingly. This should be done in consultation with civil society organizations.
EU digital transformation policies should provide more resources for enabling digital inclusion of vulnerable people (socially excluded people, ethnic minorities, older people and people with disabilities).

Other

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Original Answer
A non-digital kind of agriculture, with agro-ecological farming methods, peasant seed systems, free access to and exchange of seeds, local markets with public infrastructure and a democratic food system, has to continue to exist and be guaranteed eg. by governments.
Answer
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Original Answer
A non-digital kind of agriculture, with agro-ecological farming methods, peasant seed systems, free access to and exchange of seeds, local markets with public infrastructure and a democratic food system, has to continue to exist and be guaranteed eg. by governments.