Digital Education - Resetting education and training for the digital age

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Digital Competences - The set of basic digital skills, covering information and data literacy, online communication and collaboration, digital content creation, safety and problem solving.

Answer
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Original Answer
Access to the internet should be a fundamental human right as it is often the basis for cultural and political participation. We need policies for free, equal and affordable access to the internet for all to be developed with users and concerned parties. Governments have to commit to a just distribution of digital resources. At the same time, digital skills or access to the internet cannot be a condition or requirement for full participation in society, politics or economies. Publicly financed science, their outcomes and content must be openly accessible and not be patent-protected. Publicly relevant data such as statistical records, weather data, geographical data and maps, satellite pictures and more should be open access even if they are not publicly financed. Cooperation between science, civil society, governments, companies and media on issues concerning digitalization has to be improved and supported.
Digital skill-building should be accessible for everyone, including for persons with disabilities. Awareness on digital accessibility and basic skills of ensuring accessible digital content should be part of developing citizens’ digital competences.
There should be targeted policies and funds for people facing social exclusion, low-income households, etc., so they can acquire digital competences as any other citizen.
• Provide better opportunities for ICT training for teachers, ensuring that the educators of current societies have the right skillset to prepare learners for a digitalised society. • Proper implementation and monitoring of existing digital strategies in the EU countries must happen as for the moment there is a less need to create new actions and measures and more of a need to make a reality existent strategies. • Provide opportunities for formal, informal and non-formal education providers to collaborate and create an environment of lifelong and lifewide learning in which learners can develop the digital competences needed to adapt to the 21st century. This is essential as many CSOs have been providing opportunities to boost digital competences, especially for underprivileged learners, in formats outside of formal education. • It is essential to ensure that everything defined as basic digital skills contains a component linked to netiquette, empathy online, and such soft skills linked to the interactions between users online, so that a digital space that respects EU values can be created. • Promote a better alignment of national digital competence frameworks with DigComp, to ensure a common a language across Europe on this topics and to streamline all efforts in Europe to develop the digital competences that citizens require.
Digital competences should address people's needs in digital society beyond the job market demands and the needs of the industry. They should not be limited to technical skills (e.g. using computers, browsing the Internet, programming). Digital competences should also include soft skills, netiquette, empathy etc. Learning digital competence through informal education and civil society projects must be encouraged to a greater extent by the EU funded programmes.
A special attention should be given to include also people who are confronted with multiple obstacles for social reasons - this requires specific support programmes that must be supported by the union.
Answer
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Original Answer
Access to the internet should be a fundamental human right as it is often the basis for cultural and political participation. We need policies for free, equal and affordable access to the internet for all to be developed with users and concerned parties. Governments have to commit to a just distribution of digital resources. At the same time, digital skills or access to the internet cannot be a condition or requirement for full participation in society, politics or economies. Publicly financed science, their outcomes and content must be openly accessible and not be patent-protected. Publicly relevant data such as statistical records, weather data, geographical data and maps, satellite pictures and more should be open access even if they are not publicly financed. Cooperation between science, civil society, governments, companies and media on issues concerning digitalization has to be improved and supported.
Digital skill-building should be accessible for everyone, including for persons with disabilities. Awareness on digital accessibility and basic skills of ensuring accessible digital content should be part of developing citizens’ digital competences.
There should be targeted policies and funds for people facing social exclusion, low-income households, etc., so they can acquire digital competences as any other citizen.
• Provide better opportunities for ICT training for teachers, ensuring that the educators of current societies have the right skillset to prepare learners for a digitalised society. • Proper implementation and monitoring of existing digital strategies in the EU countries must happen as for the moment there is a less need to create new actions and measures and more of a need to make a reality existent strategies. • Provide opportunities for formal, informal and non-formal education providers to collaborate and create an environment of lifelong and lifewide learning in which learners can develop the digital competences needed to adapt to the 21st century. This is essential as many CSOs have been providing opportunities to boost digital competences, especially for underprivileged learners, in formats outside of formal education. • It is essential to ensure that everything defined as basic digital skills contains a component linked to netiquette, empathy online, and such soft skills linked to the interactions between users online, so that a digital space that respects EU values can be created. • Promote a better alignment of national digital competence frameworks with DigComp, to ensure a common a language across Europe on this topics and to streamline all efforts in Europe to develop the digital competences that citizens require.
Digital competences should address people's needs in digital society beyond the job market demands and the needs of the industry. They should not be limited to technical skills (e.g. using computers, browsing the Internet, programming). Digital competences should also include soft skills, netiquette, empathy etc. Learning digital competence through informal education and civil society projects must be encouraged to a greater extent by the EU funded programmes.
A special attention should be given to include also people who are confronted with multiple obstacles for social reasons - this requires specific support programmes that must be supported by the union.

Digital Skills - Job related skills: a set of specific digital skills for those involved in jobs including the use and maintenance of digital tools such as 3D printers, CAD software and robots. Digital skills for ICT professionals: a set of advanced, highly specialised, digital skills for those involved in the ICT occupations, for example programmers and cyber security experts who are expected not only to use but also challenge and innovate existing information and communication technologies and create new solutions.

Answer
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Original Answer
A free and fair internet needs space and competition for alternative, non-commercial, non-monopolistic products. Therefore, antitrust and competition laws have to be rigorously applied – including in the case of digital companies. IT and digital companies have to pay taxes where they generate revenue. Effective measures against tax evasion and fraud have to be applied nationally and internationally, including the strengthening of tax bodies and international tax cooperation within the EU and in an open and democratic UN institution. When it comes to new technologies, such as blockchain, questions concerning access or design for e.g. human and civil rights, the protection of data, abidance to laws and regulations, responsibilities, as well as its environmental footprint need to be in the center of any discussion. Therefore, governments have to become more knowledgeable, act faster, and not be primarily guided by economic criteria. Algorith-based technology, including artificial intelligence (AI), has proven to exhibit biased outcomes due to the underlying data or social context. Human judgment is still needed to ensure AI supported decision making is fair. If needed, AI development and usage have to be subjected to much more rigorous public discourse and proper regulation in order to ensure its usage for the common good. The public interest should always be the main driver for public funding of AI. To ensure this, only open source software AI projects should be publicly funded.
Accessibility should be mainstreamed in all programmes, initiatives and curricula for ICT professionals in the same way as data security and e-privacy is. In addition, EU should invest in development of pool of digital accessibility professionals.
Job-related skills in the digital domain should be explored as a way out of destitution for vulnerable groups like migrants, the Roma, or people facing homelessness.
• Increase the diversity of the ICT professionals. The profession is still dominated by white males, which can have serious implications when considering the inherent biases that goes into coding or into how cybersecurity is thought of.
Update European study area references to reflect nascent areas of study
Since the sector is up to now dominated by men, specific programmes for women/diverse people are necessary.
Answer
(Google logo indicates automatic translation by Google Translate)
Original Answer
A free and fair internet needs space and competition for alternative, non-commercial, non-monopolistic products. Therefore, antitrust and competition laws have to be rigorously applied – including in the case of digital companies. IT and digital companies have to pay taxes where they generate revenue. Effective measures against tax evasion and fraud have to be applied nationally and internationally, including the strengthening of tax bodies and international tax cooperation within the EU and in an open and democratic UN institution. When it comes to new technologies, such as blockchain, questions concerning access or design for e.g. human and civil rights, the protection of data, abidance to laws and regulations, responsibilities, as well as its environmental footprint need to be in the center of any discussion. Therefore, governments have to become more knowledgeable, act faster, and not be primarily guided by economic criteria. Algorith-based technology, including artificial intelligence (AI), has proven to exhibit biased outcomes due to the underlying data or social context. Human judgment is still needed to ensure AI supported decision making is fair. If needed, AI development and usage have to be subjected to much more rigorous public discourse and proper regulation in order to ensure its usage for the common good. The public interest should always be the main driver for public funding of AI. To ensure this, only open source software AI projects should be publicly funded.
Accessibility should be mainstreamed in all programmes, initiatives and curricula for ICT professionals in the same way as data security and e-privacy is. In addition, EU should invest in development of pool of digital accessibility professionals.
Job-related skills in the digital domain should be explored as a way out of destitution for vulnerable groups like migrants, the Roma, or people facing homelessness.
• Increase the diversity of the ICT professionals. The profession is still dominated by white males, which can have serious implications when considering the inherent biases that goes into coding or into how cybersecurity is thought of.
Update European study area references to reflect nascent areas of study
Since the sector is up to now dominated by men, specific programmes for women/diverse people are necessary.

Digital learning - The innovative use of digital tools and technologies during teaching and learning.

Answer
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Original Answer
Governments, companies, schools and other institutes have to ensure the protection of children’s data based on international ethical standards. IT-companies should refine tools, eg. password protections, age verification, filter or access granting, in order for parents to create an appropriate online environment for children. Teaching digital skills and supplying schools with digital equipment can be one element of a modern education system. However, lack of digital technology is in most cases not the most urgent issue of schools and other educational institutions. Funds and resources have to be allocated considering the needs of students for a proper and rights-based education. Ethics, sustainability and humans rights need to be compulsory subjects in computer science, informatics and other IT education.
Digital learning must be accessible for all students and learners. Covid-19 demonstrated the great gap in ensuring students with disabilities access to education during distance learning. EU must build on these learnings to avoid discrimination against students with disabilities in the future.
Civil society organisations and non-profit service providers, which currently support many people in social exclusion to learn ICT, should have their views included in digital education strategies.
• Establish a better monitoring process for how ICT is included in formal education, considering that in most EU countries, less than 50% of the teacher workforce states that it frequently allows learners to use ICT tools in the classroom even if the EU countries have strategies that require more reliance on ICT in the classroom. • Adapt formal education curriculum to ensure that ICT usage and skills development are better represented across all topics. • Prevent the inclusion of digital tools whose impact on learners has not been appropriately studied. • Ensure that digital tools are included only if they prove to be useful for the development of learners and only once ensured that prior introduced digital tools are already adequately used and mastered, so as to not create an abundance of digital resources that becomes too overwhelming, therefore hindering the education process.
• European Digital University (EDU), and/or a requirement for universities to record lectures and presentations and make them available on a European education platform? (put that also in the employment contract for new lecturers by default). • introduction of innovative styles of math teaching, inspired by / using the resources of YouTube tutors; Concepts include: Flipped Classroom, PreLearning and Just in Time Teaching • Exchange about school/university schedule design, innovations and best practices. Encouraging more possibilities for feedback and suggestions for reworking of currently existing (local) reference schedules (by i.e. students and teachers)
Development of digital teaching and learning should support young reach digital competences and basic ICT knowledge. But it should be based on the adequate research results and conservative until proven safe for the healthy development of young. Digital teaching and learning should be in appropriate proportion against the face to face and other classical formats. Digitalisation of society should not overrun other developmental efforts in education also represented in other key competences and general education supporting community, health, ethics and democracy.
The pandemic and lock-down tought us a lot about digital tools and their effectiveness. Digital learning should be integrated in teaching where they have prooved to be useful. We need more scientific evidence on long-term-effects of digital tools - this should be supported by the Union. Digital teaching should never be implemented at the cost of human contact.
Answer
(Google logo indicates automatic translation by Google Translate)
Original Answer
Governments, companies, schools and other institutes have to ensure the protection of children’s data based on international ethical standards. IT-companies should refine tools, eg. password protections, age verification, filter or access granting, in order for parents to create an appropriate online environment for children. Teaching digital skills and supplying schools with digital equipment can be one element of a modern education system. However, lack of digital technology is in most cases not the most urgent issue of schools and other educational institutions. Funds and resources have to be allocated considering the needs of students for a proper and rights-based education. Ethics, sustainability and humans rights need to be compulsory subjects in computer science, informatics and other IT education.
Digital learning must be accessible for all students and learners. Covid-19 demonstrated the great gap in ensuring students with disabilities access to education during distance learning. EU must build on these learnings to avoid discrimination against students with disabilities in the future.
Civil society organisations and non-profit service providers, which currently support many people in social exclusion to learn ICT, should have their views included in digital education strategies.
• Establish a better monitoring process for how ICT is included in formal education, considering that in most EU countries, less than 50% of the teacher workforce states that it frequently allows learners to use ICT tools in the classroom even if the EU countries have strategies that require more reliance on ICT in the classroom. • Adapt formal education curriculum to ensure that ICT usage and skills development are better represented across all topics. • Prevent the inclusion of digital tools whose impact on learners has not been appropriately studied. • Ensure that digital tools are included only if they prove to be useful for the development of learners and only once ensured that prior introduced digital tools are already adequately used and mastered, so as to not create an abundance of digital resources that becomes too overwhelming, therefore hindering the education process.
• European Digital University (EDU), and/or a requirement for universities to record lectures and presentations and make them available on a European education platform? (put that also in the employment contract for new lecturers by default). • introduction of innovative styles of math teaching, inspired by / using the resources of YouTube tutors; Concepts include: Flipped Classroom, PreLearning and Just in Time Teaching • Exchange about school/university schedule design, innovations and best practices. Encouraging more possibilities for feedback and suggestions for reworking of currently existing (local) reference schedules (by i.e. students and teachers)
Development of digital teaching and learning should support young reach digital competences and basic ICT knowledge. But it should be based on the adequate research results and conservative until proven safe for the healthy development of young. Digital teaching and learning should be in appropriate proportion against the face to face and other classical formats. Digitalisation of society should not overrun other developmental efforts in education also represented in other key competences and general education supporting community, health, ethics and democracy.
The pandemic and lock-down tought us a lot about digital tools and their effectiveness. Digital learning should be integrated in teaching where they have prooved to be useful. We need more scientific evidence on long-term-effects of digital tools - this should be supported by the Union. Digital teaching should never be implemented at the cost of human contact.

Media literacy - The skills that allow people to access, critically evaluate, and create or shape the media.

Answer
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Original Answer
Public institutions and agencies have to urgently increase their digital literacy and better understand the role and impact of technology, software and algorithms, and of proper regulation. E-Government has to serve the people. This also includes the improving online accessibility of official documents and information, as well as strict regulation on the use of citizen’s and non-citizen’s data.
Media literacy skill-building should be accessible for persons with disabilities: this includes all formal, non-formal educational programmes, public campaigns, etc. Citizens should be given basic skills for creating and shaping accessible media content.
Promote and support digital and media literacy as part of democracy education, to empower citizens to navigate the digital environment, have equal access to information, and enjoy an equal ability to critically form opinions and engage in agenda setting. This can be achieved with digital skills programmes that build on local initiatives and entry points, and public education.
Digital competences should address people's needs in digital society beyond the job market demands and the needs of the industry. They should not be limited to technical skills (e.g. using computers, browsing the Internet, programming). Digital competences should also include soft skills, netiquette, empathy etc. Learning digital competence through informal education and civil society projects must be encouraged to a greater extent by the EU funded programmes.
Media literacy has to be integrated not only in civic education for students - we need a broader communication on that topic. The evaluation of sources must be trained continuously to differentiate between thrustworthy sources and fakes.
Answer
(Google logo indicates automatic translation by Google Translate)
Original Answer
Public institutions and agencies have to urgently increase their digital literacy and better understand the role and impact of technology, software and algorithms, and of proper regulation. E-Government has to serve the people. This also includes the improving online accessibility of official documents and information, as well as strict regulation on the use of citizen’s and non-citizen’s data.
Media literacy skill-building should be accessible for persons with disabilities: this includes all formal, non-formal educational programmes, public campaigns, etc. Citizens should be given basic skills for creating and shaping accessible media content.
Promote and support digital and media literacy as part of democracy education, to empower citizens to navigate the digital environment, have equal access to information, and enjoy an equal ability to critically form opinions and engage in agenda setting. This can be achieved with digital skills programmes that build on local initiatives and entry points, and public education.
Digital competences should address people's needs in digital society beyond the job market demands and the needs of the industry. They should not be limited to technical skills (e.g. using computers, browsing the Internet, programming). Digital competences should also include soft skills, netiquette, empathy etc. Learning digital competence through informal education and civil society projects must be encouraged to a greater extent by the EU funded programmes.
Media literacy has to be integrated not only in civic education for students - we need a broader communication on that topic. The evaluation of sources must be trained continuously to differentiate between thrustworthy sources and fakes.

Awareness raising – Informing and communicating to citizens about digital practices.

Answer
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Original Answer
Public projects and programs on digitalization should focus on overcoming the digital divide. Their purpose has to be to increase capabilities of all citizens and public institutions in e.g. data protection or virtual communication as well as to provide the basis for an inclusive discussion on possibilities and risks of technologies and the digital world.
Awareness raising, including social media campaigns, audiovisual information, public events must be accessible and inclusive for all citizens.
It should be explored how ICT and social media can be used to raise awareness about social exclusion and as a tool to empower socially excluded individuals.
Support awareness raising on privacy and data protection, and how citizens can safeguard their privacy in their digital lives, through dedicated campaigns and civic education programmes supported with EU and national funds.
• The language used to raise awareness must be free of ambiguities, and use as little as possible jargon that is not commonly understood by the population.
Create dedicated awareness programs, in order to ensure diversity in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) education programs in order to encourage equal access to STEM education.
The importance of data protection is not yet present in the minds of people - awareness raising cannot be left to teachers alone. We need specific programs to adress also adults and elderly people.
Answer
(Google logo indicates automatic translation by Google Translate)
Original Answer
Public projects and programs on digitalization should focus on overcoming the digital divide. Their purpose has to be to increase capabilities of all citizens and public institutions in e.g. data protection or virtual communication as well as to provide the basis for an inclusive discussion on possibilities and risks of technologies and the digital world.
Awareness raising, including social media campaigns, audiovisual information, public events must be accessible and inclusive for all citizens.
It should be explored how ICT and social media can be used to raise awareness about social exclusion and as a tool to empower socially excluded individuals.
Support awareness raising on privacy and data protection, and how citizens can safeguard their privacy in their digital lives, through dedicated campaigns and civic education programmes supported with EU and national funds.
• The language used to raise awareness must be free of ambiguities, and use as little as possible jargon that is not commonly understood by the population.
Create dedicated awareness programs, in order to ensure diversity in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) education programs in order to encourage equal access to STEM education.
The importance of data protection is not yet present in the minds of people - awareness raising cannot be left to teachers alone. We need specific programs to adress also adults and elderly people.

Other

Answer
(Google logo indicates automatic translation by Google Translate)
Original Answer
Disclaimer: Sorry for the confusion, I added some of this in the democracy part as well - did only see the other surveys afterwards and did not see how to change proir answers.
Mainstreaming accessibility is vital to ensure that digitalization of education leaves no ones behind. Citizens must always have alternative – non-digital- ways of accessing education.
Answer
(Google logo indicates automatic translation by Google Translate)
Original Answer
Disclaimer: Sorry for the confusion, I added some of this in the democracy part as well - did only see the other surveys afterwards and did not see how to change proir answers.
Mainstreaming accessibility is vital to ensure that digitalization of education leaves no ones behind. Citizens must always have alternative – non-digital- ways of accessing education.